Queensland's Citizen Science Hub

Resources

Finding scientific information

This site is dedicated primarily to showcasing the information generated by member societies, although it also includes various other materials of general public interest.

Don’t forget to search your local library. All public libraries nowadays have powerful search engines. To search multiple libraries, try Trove, the National Library of Australia’s umbrella search engine. It indexes books, periodicals and other materials held in the National Library and a large number of other contributing libraries including universities. (For example, it indexes more than 420,000 items in the Brisbane City Council library network and more than 2 million from The University of Queensland’s libraries).

Seeking a document from a defunct website? Try Pandora, the National Library’s archival engine that sweeps a select range of official and other websites (including that of The Royal Society of Queensland) periodically and stores them in perpetuity.

Below is a searchable list of all information resources posted to this site.


Royal Society Member Ron Turner has produced a delightful e-book on the lighthouses of Australia. 18 lighthouses in Queensland are featured, each with an impressive photograph and a page of notes. The compilation will be an excellent companion for anyone visiting one of structures, each one a masterpiece of innovation.

It can be found at  www.esplash.me    Scroll down to the Featured Publications section where this eBook can be found together with articles relating to the authors’ sojourns at two Queensland lighthouses in recent years (Living at a Lighthouse) even a ‘History of Fraser NP’ and several other articles about that park.

Hosted and coordinated by the South East Queensland Fire and Biodiversity Consortium, Bushfire 2016: Connecting Science, People and Practice was a national conference held on the 28 – 30th September 2016, at the University of Queensland, aimed at connecting fire scientists, ecologists and students with on-ground fire operators, land managers and other fire and environmental professionals.

Bushfire 2016 Program

Bushfire 2016 Outcomes Report

In June 2019, the SEQ Fire and Biodiversity Consortium held its 20-year anniversary celebration, at the Mt Coot-tha Botanic Gardens, Toowong. With the theme Fire, Research and Partnerships, this forum showcased projects and programs that highlight the value of partnerships and longevity in applied fire ecology and on-ground management. Consistent with the long-standing objective of the Consortium, there was a focus on translating science into practice, including student projects.

Algal blooms were evident in the lower Pumicestone Passage and on Bribie Island beaches late in October 2019.  This media report aims to dispel some myths that these phenomena are “natural” events without human influence. A potential solution (constructed wetlands to alleviate stormwater impacts) is flagged. Sewage is also a major contributor to phosphorus pollution in Moreton Bay.  The aquatic systems are under stress: these warning signs need to be heeded.

 

A Sustainable Queensland Forum – Royal Society of Queensland symposium

Rural producers, natural resource managers and conservation managers face a
constantly changing set of climatic and human influences. Traditional land
production systems and environmental management are under pressure. New
approaches to production and natural resource management are required in
the face of government financial resource and capacity constraints, as well as
the intensifying environmental challenges. Download full summary here.

Ron Turner, former Ranger-in-Charge at Cooloola National Park, with wife Yvonne, has written some thoroughly readable memoirs of his experiences. Take for example the charming e-book Living at a Lighthouse, chronicling sojourns at Bustard Head and Double Island Point lighthouses on Queensland’s central-south coast. This is available under Creative Commons BY 4.0 by generous permission of David Hibbert, of the central Victorian town of Alexandra and is an e-book published on his Artworkz website http://esplash.me/ .

Benefit-cost analysis (BCA, also called cost-benefit analysis) is a tool commonly used to estimate the economic consequences of a new project.  A development with a ratio greater than 1:1 is said to be economically worthwhile. However, the technique is really valid only for comparing two projects at the one time using an identical method, because estimates by different economists usually adopt different methods or assumptions.

Howard Guille has written an insightful explanation of benefit-cost analysis focused on the Toondah Harbour project, near Cleveland. The article is reproduced with the permission of the author and the Redlands 2030 community website.


This Bird of the Month is presented by Dr. William Feeney, a research fellow at the University of Queensland. The interactions between cuckoos and their hosts form part of Will’s current research.

The Fan-tailed Cuckoo (Cacomantis flabelliformis) is one of Australia’s ten brood parasitic cuckoos (eleven if you include the Oriental Cuckoo [Cuculus optatus]; though, this species does not breed in Australia) and is common throughout Queensland’s woodlands. It visually resembles the closely-related Brush (C. variolosus) and Chestnut-breasted (C. castaneiventris) Cuckoos, and can be distinguished from the Brush Cuckoo through the presence of its conspicuous yellow eye ring, and from the Chestnut-breasted Cuckoo through its noticeably duller breast colouration. The Chestnut-breasted Cuckoo is also restricted in its distribution to northern Queensland. While over 70 songbird species have been recorded to be parasitised by the Fan-tailed Cuckoo, 17 species are recognised as biological hosts but the majority of parasitism records are from the White-browed Scrubwren (Sericornis frontalis) as well as the Brown (Acanthiza pusilla) and Inland (A. apicalis) Thornbills Continue reading

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