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The Royal Society of Queensland has published A Rangelands Dialogue: Towards a Sustainable Future , being a Special Issue of the Proceedings of The Royal Society of Queensland. The volume is a compilation of some 26 papers – short communications and opinion pieces –arising from the July 2019 Rangelands Policy Dialogue. The complete volume (43 MB) and the individual articles are available online free of charge. Printed copies may be ordered from the Society, rsocqld AT gmail.com.


Fire and Biodiversity Consortium to expand reach across Queensland

The South East Queensland Fire and Biodiversity Consortium (SEQFBC) has expanded its reach to cover the whole of Queensland. The new name is Queensland Fire and Biodiversity Consortium (QFBC).  

This statewide expansion reflects the increased demand from landholders and stakeholders to receive the high-quality products and services provided by the QFBC. Established in 1998, one of the oldest collaborative fire programs in Australia, the success and value of the QFBC is underscored by the collaborative, tenure-blind approach to fire management. 

The QFBC comprises a network of land managers and stakeholders committed to improving fire and biodiversity management outcomes, supporting and distributing fire ecology research, facilitating partnerships between key stakeholders and building the capacity of land managers and private land owners to address issues of fire management and biodiversity in the South East Queensland (SEQ) region and across Queensland.
  
According to Dr Samantha Lloyd, Manager of QFBC, the focus will remain with current partners, the majority of whom are based in SEQ. “We have a number of state-based partners and requests for our services and resources outside of SEQ continue to increase. … The prospect of engaging with the wider Queensland community will enrich our network and strengthen our support base,” Lloyd said. 

The QFBC is a flagship program of Healthy Land and Water, an independent not-for-profit organisation and the regional delivery body for the federal Government’s National Regional Land Partnerships program.

“One of the key strengths of the QFBC is the number and diversity of partners, who enabled the growth and reach across Queensland. We look forward to working with new stakeholders across Queensland and to help facilitate fire and land management outcomes for the environment and community,” said Julie McLellan, CEO of Healthy Land and Water. 

The first issue of a Newsletter for the Queensland Science Network was published on 7 August 2020. This new initiative is intended partly to showcase the work of the scientific and natural history groups who comprise the Network, and partly to bring items of general scientific interest to the attention of the public.

Download the Newsletter here (2.539 MB). Editor Col Lynam (col.lynam AT gmail.com) welcomes feedback on this Newsletter and items for the next edition.


A new website about some birds of South-East Queensland  www.ourlocalbirds.com looks into their amazing lives via a unique and exciting range of video and still images as well text and audio.

The website www.ourlocalbirds.com has two principal sections: Learning about birds and Teaching about birds and was created by the Bird Education Group of Birds Queensland and Birdlife Southern Queensland.

Learning about birds features 18 birds commonly seen in urban and suburban areas.

Teaching About Birds has been designed for primary age students, their teachers and home educators and aligns with objectives in the Australian Science Curriculum for each year level: 1-6. Videos have been created to illustrate the curriculum focus for each year level. Examples are the video about the Australian White Ibis https://vimeo.com/336966421 for Year 5 students investigating how animals adapt to environments and the video https://vimeo.com/394819136 for Year 6 students studying the extraordinary migratory shorebirds that migrate to the other end of the globe to breed but that live, at least for part of each year, at our urban backdoor in Moreton Bay.


Western Sydney University and the University of New England have set up a Citizen Science Project called the Dead Tree Detective.

The aim of the project is to collect observations of dead or dying trees around Australia. It sounds a bit grim, but knowing where and when trees have died will help us to work out what the cause is, identify trees that are vulnerable, and take steps to protect them.

This project will allow people Australia-wide to report observations of tree death. In the past, there have been many occurrences of large-scale tree death that were initially identified by concerned members of the public such as farmers, bushwalkers, bird watchers and landholders. Collecting these observations is an important way to monitor the health of trees and ecosystems.

Royal Society Member Ron Turner has produced a delightful e-book on the lighthouses of Australia. 18 lighthouses in Queensland are featured, each with an impressive photograph and a page of notes. The compilation will be an excellent companion for anyone visiting one of structures, each one a masterpiece of innovation.

It can be found at  www.esplash.me    Scroll down to the Featured Publications section where this eBook can be found together with articles relating to the authors’ sojourns at two Queensland lighthouses in recent years (Living at a Lighthouse) even a ‘History of Fraser NP’ and several other articles about that park.

Source: ABC Triple J Hack Program, THURSDAY 14 NOVEMBER 2019 3:47PM

Author: James Purtill

“Going local: Involving landholders more in bushfire strategy: All the experts agree the current shouting match over bushfire mitigation strategies is far too simplistic and unhelpfully lumps together many different types of fire ecology. What works in a savannah grassland won’t necessarily work in a temperate forest. Continue reading

Algal blooms were evident in the lower Pumicestone Passage and on Bribie Island beaches late in October 2019.  This media report aims to dispel some myths that these phenomena are “natural” events without human influence. A potential solution (constructed wetlands to alleviate stormwater impacts) is flagged. Sewage is also a major contributor to phosphorus pollution in Moreton Bay.  The aquatic systems are under stress: these warning signs need to be heeded.

 

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