Queensland's Citizen Science Hub

Educational Materials Library

Australian Dr John Cook has developed a game, Cranky Uncle, to explain global warming and climate denialism. The game is promoted on the site www.skepticalscience.com as a teaching tool, for secondary and tertiary levels. The game is accompanied by a book and a Teachers’ Guide.

The website has a wealth of material on climate change and global warming. The site is tailored towards a popular audience and is authoritative.


By Jodi Rowley Curator, Amphibian & Reptile Conservation Biology, Australian Museum

Australia has 240 known species of frog, almost all of which are found nowhere else in the world. Some species are flourishing, like the Striped Marsh Frog. But others have declined dramatically since the 1980s, and four have become extinct.

Croaks, whistles, bleats and barks – every frog species makes a different sound. By recording a frog call with the FrogID app, students will discover which frogs live around them and help us count Australia’s frogs, empowering your students to be citizen scientists.

FrogID is a national citizen science project that is helping us learn more about what is happening to Australia’s frogs. All around the country, people are recording frog calls with nothing more than a smartphone.

With the data obtained through FrogID we are able to track the Cane Toad and identify where frogs are thriving and where they aren’t. And by matching calls to weather and habitat, we are learning more about how different frog species are responding to a changing environment.

Get your class and students involved in FrogID:

  1. Create account & group at FrogID.net.au
  2. Instruct students to create account & join class
  3. Download the FrogID App, Sign In & Record
  4. Check Leaderboard for Results

https://theconversation.com/clicks-bonks-and-dripping-taps-listen-to-the-calls-of-6-frogs-out-and-about-this-summer

A useful index to materials to help with the identification of weeds was published by Moreton Bay Regional Council in its Voluntary Conservation Programs Update Newsletter of May 2020. Thanks to Council for permission to republish this index here. Click on the image above to bring up a PDF that contains the hotlinks to the various resources identified.

Online_weed_guide

The Queensland Government’s Long Paddock website has provided climate and pasture information to the grazing community since 1995. The site provides access to rainfall and pasture outlooks and decision-support tools to support land management decision-making and planning for landholders, educators, consultants and extension officers.

The SILO site, a component of the Long Paddock, is a database of Australian climate data from 1889 to the present. It provides daily meteorological datasets for a range of climate variables in ready-to-use formats.

Algal blooms were evident in the lower Pumicestone Passage and on Bribie Island beaches late in October 2019.  This media report aims to dispel some myths that these phenomena are “natural” events without human influence. A potential solution (constructed wetlands to alleviate stormwater impacts) is flagged. Sewage is also a major contributor to phosphorus pollution in Moreton Bay.  The aquatic systems are under stress: these warning signs need to be heeded.

 

Ron Turner, former Ranger-in-Charge at Cooloola National Park, with wife Yvonne, has written some thoroughly readable memoirs of his experiences. Take for example the charming e-book Living at a Lighthouse, chronicling sojourns at Bustard Head and Double Island Point lighthouses on Queensland’s central-south coast. This is available under Creative Commons BY 4.0 by generous permission of David Hibbert, of the central Victorian town of Alexandra and is an e-book published on his Artworkz website http://esplash.me/ .

Royal Society of Queensland member Ariel Marcy has made available her free science game design platform, DIY Go Extinct! Students can create one-of-a-kind Go Extinct! games featuring evolutionary trees of Australian marsupials, megafauna, flowers, dinosaurs, venomous snakes, and citizens of the Great Barrier Reef! (available now at www.steamgalaxy.com/design-your-own-game/). The platform, supported by grants from the Advance Queensland initiative and from the U.S. Embassy continues to be live for families, game enthusiasts and classrooms alike to use worldwide.

This article briefly explains the value of estuaries and the threats they are facing.

Estuaries – A Primer

Estuaries – once the world’s powerhouse of productivity – are now predominantly the habitat of humans.  Yes, the world’s most productive ecosystems are where tide meets freshwater, a mixing zone of biodiversity and food – of diatoms, phytoplankton, birds, fish and prawns.

Unfortunately globally, these are also now the most trashed systems.  Humans love to live near water, and here in Australia the vast majority of us crowd the coast and fill, drain, divert, dam and occupy what were once our estuaries. Continue reading

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